Tag Archives: book launch

A Big Thank You!

beautiful&deadlycover FINALWow, what a fantastic launch. I have so many people I want to thank.

To those who donated prizes…

Please support these fabulous, generous people by checking out their websites.

To those who came to the launch party…

I loved having you all there–you made the launch party a success. I had so much fun sharing excerpts and behind the story tidbits. Thank you for participating in the quizzes and competitions. Thank you especially to everyone who got the word out about the launch party and invited their friends.

A big thank you to everyone who picked up a copy of the book…

It was exciting seeing so many people grabbing their free copies during the launch. I am especially thankful to everyone who has been spreading the word about ‘Beautiful & Deadly‘. The free promo is now over, but you can pick up a copy for $3.49 USD/ $4.85 AUD.

Some stats

It was exciting watching ‘Beautiful & Deadly‘ moving up the charts throughout the launch. These were the top stats:

#6 in Fantasy Collections and Anthologies (Amazon.com.au)
#22 in Paranormal (Amazon.com.au)
#28 in Superhero (Amazon.com)
#36 in Fantasy Anthologies and Short Stories (Amazon.com)
#900 in free kindle store on Amazon.com.au
#3805 in free kindle store on Amazon.com

bestseller amazon au 2 Oct 11am collections

I am still absolutely amazed by those stats!

Thank you in advance…

To everyone who reviews. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the collection.

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Launch Day! 3 Reasons to Come to the Launch Party!

beautiful&deadlycover FINALI’m so excited!!! I can’t believe launch day is finally here! As of right now Beautiful & Deadly is LIVE on Amazon! Check it out here. It’s currently priced at $3.49 USD ($4.85 AUD), but it will become FREE for 48 hours to coincide with the launch party. So at about 12:00am PST (7:00pm AEST) on the 30th September it will become available FREE!

3 Reasons to Come to the Launch Party!

Number 1

There are going to be some great PRIZE GIVEAWAYS! Including:

Number 2

I’ll be posting excerpts and sharing the background behind the stories over the duration of the launch. Plus there are some fun activities planned, too!

Number 3

You’ll be the first to know when the book goes FREE!

I seriously can’t contain how excited I am! I hope to see you all at the launch party. Please spread the word!

CLICK HERE to JOIN THE LAUNCH PARTY!

One Week Until ‘Beautiful & Deadly’ Launches (and you’re invited to the launch party!)

beautiful&deadlycover FINALI can’t believe I’ll be releasing my short story collection ‘Beautiful & Deadly’ in just one week! Things are starting to get scary and exciting. Not to mention busy, busy, busy. At the moment I’m putting together a Facebook launch party to coincide with the launch of the book on Amazon. You’re all invited, so pop by and join the event! There’ll be book excerpts, behind the story tidbits, fun activities, discussions and, best of all, PRIZES! I’ve had some awesome prizes donated by author D.K. Burrow, Mumma H Nutrimetics, Wrap Me Delicious – It Works! Global and the Leigh Family Juice Plus franchise.

Today I wanted to share the line up of stories that will be appearing in the collection. Many of them have appeared in anthologies over the years and now they’ll be all together in one collection. There’s also several new, never-before-published stories.

The Line Up

Angel Blood

Eighteen for Life

Aphrodite

Love Bites

A Troll for Christmas

Curse of the Falls

Island of No Return

Red Lipstick

Spectrum

Spectrum and Captain Awesome vs. Arachnid

Equinox

Ice Crystals

The Seashell

The Sweet Taste of Self-Loathing

Maya and the Prince

The Bony Finger of Death

Do any of those titles sound intriguing? Which one do you most want to read?

Fingers crossed everything goes smoothly for the launch. I’m hoping to offer the book FREE for the first 48 hours!

Interview with Steve Rossiter

Today I’d like to welcome Steve Rossiter to my blog. Steve runs The Australian Literature Review (www.auslit.net) and Writing Teen Novels (www.writingteennovels.com) and is the editor of various anthologies, including Australian Literature: A Snapshot in 10 Short Stories (featuring one of my first ever published stories) and the recently released The Life and Times of Chester Lewis. Steve offers great opportunities to emerging writers through his programs and he has played a big role in my own writing journey. It is a pleasure to have been able to interview him and pick his brain.

You wrote the final story in The Life and Times of Chester Lewis, can you tell us a little bit about it (without giving away any spoilers)?

The final story takes place around Chester Lewis’s 100th birthday and is told from the POV of his granddaughter. It marks the end of Chester’s life story but raises new implications for the Lewis family.

I wanted to create a final story which would spark readers’ imaginations rather than, say, wind down and have Chester reflect on the past 100 years of his life.

You were also the editor for The Life and Times of Chester Lewis, how did you balance your two different roles? Was it difficult switching between writer and editor?

Since I wrote the final story, my main role for the most of the process was as editor.

It wasn’t difficult to switch between the two roles at the end. I wrote my story with pen and notepad then did my first full edit of the story as I typed it onto the computer.

As well as the various short story anthologies you have published, you also run The Australian Literature Review, which often has short story competitions. You must be somewhat an expert on what makes a short story stand out after all the stories you’ve seen! What are your biggest tips for writers of short stories?

In a previous interview, I was asked what makes a compelling character and I responded that it is a combination of purpose and personality. This would be a good place to start for developing a short story idea. I mean developing a character in the full context of that fictional person and the story-world in which they are situated – not just to pick a goal and label a few personality traits in an abstract way. A character’s sense of purpose and their personality will, of necessity, draw from the story-world in which they are situated.

A simple but important tip is: create a story concept before you start writing. Many fiction writers just write with no story concept in mind and hope a story will emerge, or they write about the setting and/or character relationships with no clear sense of purpose or story momentum. This is fine if you’re writing something as a brainstorming exercise to help trigger an idea to adapt into a story concept, but many writers write without clear purpose and use the result as the end story.

The basic components of a story concept could be summarised as:

1)    A character (in the full context of being a fictional person situated in their story-world) actively pursues a goal.

2)    That character and other characters care about the outcome, but for conflicting reasons.

Readers will care about the outcome if they relate to why the characters care and what they do to pursue their desired outcome.

There is a fan fiction writing competition running on chesterlewis.net, do you have any advice for those hoping to enter?

Making an early decision to enter the competition is a good idea, so they have plenty of time to write a good story, then get some reader feedback and refine it before submitting. It runs until August 31st 2013, but writers can sign up early and they have until August 31st to send their story in. There is a $10 entry fee before March 31st(or $15 for those who sign up between April 1st and August 31st).

Participating in the private Chester Lewis Fan Fiction Group on Facebook is a good idea. Once signed up, the private Facebook group is available for entrants to discuss story ideas and their writing, to meet other writers, to receive fiction writing tips, and where authors from the book and some of their publishing industry friends will drop by from time to time.

Can you tell us about some of your current favourite authors/books and what makes them stand out for you?

I don’t so much have a few authors who are my absolute favourites as I have a range of reading interests and like various authors for different reasons.

Off the top of my head, some Australian authors whose novels I like include Fiona McIntosh, Rebecca James, LM Fuge, Tony Park and Jaye Ford, and some international authors whose novels I like include Stephen King, Gregg Hurwitz, Jodi Picoult, Thomas Harris, Cynthia Voigt, April Henry and Bernard Beckett.

If I was to lump the authors together and describe some things their novels tend to have in common, I would say they have characters with purpose and personality, they have a story with clear stakes, they have an easy-to-read style, and they explore interesting subject matter with intelligence and originality.

What are you working on right now?

I am currently writing a novel set in 1939 Poland with a teenage main character, intended for publication in 2014. My aim is for the novel to be entertaining for teen readers and a serious historical novel for adult readers.

I have Writing Teen Novels (www.writingteennovels.com) undergoing a big expansion from January 1st to feature daily posts throughout the year from a great mix of established novelists from around the world. There will be more than 20 novelists with a post per month throughout 2013 and guest novelists each month.

I will be launching Writing Historical Novels from January 1st along similar lines as the expanded Writing Teen Novels site.

The line-up of authors for these two sites will be announced in December. There will be numerous New York Times bestselling novelists as monthly contributors on each site (including one with more than 75 million copies in print), as well as novelists who are also professors, historians, feature film directors, screenwriters and producers for film and TV, scientists, non-fiction authors, documentary makers, teachers, journalists (including a Pulitzer Prize winner), and more.

I also have Writing Novels in Australia (www.writingnovelsinaustralia.com) – initially a place for members of a writing program I ran in the first half of this year to put down some thoughts about their writing and to reach readers – relaunching from January 1st with a mix of Australian aspiring novelists, early-career novelists and established novelists, including authors such as Helene Young (published by Hachette and Penguin) and Greg Barron (published by HarperCollins).

Any parting words of wisdom?

Write the kind of fiction you find personally rewarding. If your aims for your fiction include commercial publication or to be read by other people (and most writers want their writing to be read by other people in some capacity), find some overlap in what you find personally rewarding to write and what others find personally rewarding to read.

 Thank you, Steve, and good luck with rest of your blog tour!

If anyone would like to see Steve’s blog tour schedule or read some of his previous interviews or guest posts on his tour, please follow this link.

Book website: www.ChesterLewis.net

Facebook page: www.facebook.com/TheLifeandTimesofChesterLewis

Writing an Action Scene

Last week I was answering interview questions about my story in the integrated short story collection The Life and Times of Chester Lewis and, since I hadn’t looked at it in quite a while, I gave the story a reread. Like most writers (I would imagine), I couldn’t help but think there were places where I could have written more tightly or hooked the reader in more. As writers I don’t think we ever stop editing our stories in our heads, even after they’ve published. I’m a perfectionist in that way, and I don’t think I can ever feel like my writing is perfect. Good, maybe, but perfect, no.

I did concede to myself, however, that I was quite happy with how the main action scene turned out. There are some main points I keep in mind when writing action scenes that I think make a world of difference:

1. Short, sharp sentences pack a punch.

2. But, it is also important to vary sentence length to keep readers engaged, not bored. Short, sharp sentences lose their impact if you don’t vary them with some longer (but not too long) sentences.

3. Get into your character’s head. Think about his or her reactions.

4. Up the stakes. Just when it looks like the character will be triumphant, just when they’ve got the upper hand, turn the tables. Throw the worst case scenario at him or her. Make it seem as though all hope is lost and there is no way out.

If you want to check out my Chester Lewis story and judge my action scene for yourself, The Life and Times of Chester Lewis is actually on special offer today for its launch. You can grab a copy of the ebook for $0.99 (it’s normally $3.99). This is an especially good opportunity to pick up a copy and get started on you fanfic story (if you’re entering). Remember, it’s $2000 for the winner of the competition and it’s open worldwide. What a great opportunity!

Do you have any tips for writing action scenes? What really hooks you in when you’re reading them? Do you have any favourite action scenes from books you’ve read?

100 Stories for Queensland – A Review

A devastating flood…

In late December last year and early January this year Queensland, Australia was hit by devastating floods. At one time or another, floods covered ninety per cent of the state. Crops were destroyed, homes and lives were lost. Watching the devastation unfold in the media left me with a feeling of horror. The stories that came to surface had me in tears.

The call…

On the 11th of January Trevor Belshaw put out a call on Twitter and Facebook “100 stories for Queensland?”.

The response…

Authors from around the world submitted upbeat and uplifting stories of fiction. One hundred of those stories were chosen for an anthology whose purpose is to raise money for those affected by the floods. Those working behind the scenes, such as editor Jodi Cleghorn, have worked hard and done an amazing job compiling those stories into a beautiful book.

The launch…

On the 3rd of May the eBook of 100 Stories for Queensland was launched and can be bought on the 100 Stories for Queensland website (you can even read a free sample of stories before you buy). In a fortnight the print version of 100 Stories for Queensland will be available from Amazon and the Book Depository and may be ordered from your local bookstore.

My Review

After being brought to tears by Kate Eltham’s beautiful introduction, I’ve been reading through the fantastic collection of stories contained within 100 Stories for Queensland. Here is just a snapshot on my thoughts on a few of the stories.

John Baird’s ‘The Safe Option’ is a very clever story. I loved the twist.

Kim Bannerman’s ‘The Turtle Inventory’ is cute and funny. All those turtles!

Alan Baxter’s ‘The SpeakingTree’ is a tale of life. I loved the old fig tree.

Stephen Book’s ‘After All These Years’ has great characterisation. It reminds me of one of my favourite series: the Sookie Stackhouse novels by Charlaine Harris.

Gillian Brown’s ‘The Anniversary’ has a funny ending.

Christopher Chartrand’s ‘The Carver’s Daughter’ is a sweet story. It almost made me cry.

Jennifer Domingo’s ‘One Tenth of a Second’ is a story of unbeatable odds and doing your best anyway. It brought a smile to my face.

Karen Field’s ‘Amunet’s Gift’ is very sweet. It has great visual imagery.

Emma Karry’s ‘Confessions of a Toddler’ gave me a good giggle. It reminded me of a certain little toddler living in my house.

I’m only two thirds of the way through reading all the stories so far, and I’m looking forward to reading the rest of them.

I feel privileged to be included amongst these talented writers and to be a part of something raising money for those affected by the floods. It’s such a great cause, I hope you will consider buying a copy to help out. I know I will be buying a copy (or two). Remember 100% of the sales from the eBook and 100% of the wholesale price of the paperback (excluding printing costs) go to the Queensland Premier’s Flood Relief Fund.